George and Ann RichardsCivil War Era Center

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Manuscript Workshop #6 with Jacob Lee, Associate Professor of History, Penn State

May 1, 2024
12:30PM
– 2:00PM
In Person
April 29, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Many Wests Conference

April 26, 2024
In Person

Many Wests Conference

April 25, 2024
In Person
April 22, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Final Brose Lecture featuring Thavolia Glymph, Professor of History and Law at Duke University

April 20, 2024
11:30AM
In Person
Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library

Dr. Thavolia Glymph, Peabody Family Distinguished Professor of History and Professor of Law at Duke University, will deliver three lectures on “Playing ‘Dixie’ in Egypt: A Transnational Transcript of Race, Nation, Empire and Citizenship,” for the Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lecture Series. Taking place on April 18, 19, and 20, the lectures are free and open to the public. This lecture series is sponsored by the George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center at Penn State through the generosity of an endowment by Steven and Janice Brose and cosponsored by the Penn State University Libraries.

The third and final Brose Lecture will be held on Saturday, April 20, at 11:30 a.m., Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library: “Egypt in the American Imaginary and the making of an American Archive of Race and Nation.”

“Playing ‘Dixie’ in Egypt: A Transnational Transcript of Race, Nation, Empire and Citizenship” is a study of white Union and Confederate soldiers who joined the Egyptian army of the Khedive Isma’il after the Civil War. It explores why they left the U.S. to become mercenaries of a foreign army and, more centrally, the part they played in making and transcribing notions of race, citizenship, nation, and empire globally and at home. In Egypt, the American Civil War veterans joined an international force of mercenaries, diplomats, explorers, antiquities seekers, journalists, representatives of geographical societies, arms dealers, and tourists, many of whom, like them, were engaged in the fight against the imagined “horrors of racial equality.” In this work, they had the support of the U.S. government— from the White House to Congress and the U.S. Army—and the applause of their communities. When the last of them returned home, Reconstruction was over, and they could say they had played a part in its overthrow.

Second Brose Lecture featuring Thavolia Glymph, Professor of History and Law at Duke University

April 19, 2024
5:00PM
In Person
Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library

Dr. Thavolia Glymph, Peabody Family Distinguished Professor of History and Professor of Law at Duke University, will deliver three lectures on “Playing ‘Dixie’ in Egypt: A Transnational Transcript of Race, Nation, Empire and Citizenship,” for the 2023 Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lecture Series. Taking place on April 18, 19, and 20, the lectures are free and open to the public. This lecture series is sponsored by the George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center at Penn State through the generosity of an endowment by Steven and Janice Brose and cosponsored by the Penn State University Libraries.

The second Brose Lecture will be held on Friday, April 19, at 5 p.m., Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library: Playing “Dixie” in the Wilds of Africa.

“Playing ‘Dixie’ in Egypt: A Transnational Transcript of Race, Nation, Empire and Citizenship” is a study of white Union and Confederate soldiers who joined the Egyptian army of the Khedive Isma’il after the Civil War. It explores why they left the U.S. to become mercenaries of a foreign army and, more centrally, the part they played in making and transcribing notions of race, citizenship, nation, and empire globally and at home. In Egypt, the American Civil War veterans joined an international force of mercenaries, diplomats, explorers, antiquities seekers, journalists, representatives of geographical societies, arms dealers, and tourists, many of whom, like them, were engaged in the fight against the imagined “horrors of racial equality.” In this work, they had the support of the U.S. government— from the White House to Congress and the U.S. Army—and the applause of their communities. When the last of them returned home, Reconstruction was over, and they could say they had played a part in its overthrow.

 

Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lecture Series

April 18, 2024
– April 20, 2024
In Person
Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library

Dr. Thavolia Glymph, Peabody Family Distinguished Professor of History and Professor of Law at Duke University, will deliver three lectures on “Playing ‘Dixie’ in Egypt: A Transnational Transcript of Race, Nation, Empire and Citizenship,” for the Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lecture Series. Taking place on April 18, 19, and 20, the lectures are free and open to the public. This lecture series is sponsored by the George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center at Penn State through the generosity of an endowment by Steven and Janice Brose and cosponsored by the Penn State University Libraries.

Dr. Glymph’s lectures are a study of white Union and Confederate soldiers who joined the Egyptian army of the Khedive Isma’il after the Civil War. It explores why they left the U.S. to become mercenaries of a foreign army and, more centrally, the part they played in making and transcribing notions of race, citizenship, nation, and empire globally and at home. In Egypt, the American Civil War veterans joined an international force of mercenaries, diplomats, explorers, antiquities seekers, journalists, representatives of geographical societies, arms dealers, and tourists, many of whom, like them, were engaged in the fight against the imagined “horrors of racial equality.” In this work, they had the support of the U.S. government—from the White House to Congress and the U.S. Army—and the applause of their communities. When the last of them returned home, Reconstruction was over, and they could say they had played a part in its overthrow.

The schedule is as follows:

  • Thursday, April 18, at 5 p.m., Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library: “’I am not going into the wilds of Africa’: Race and Nation in the Imagination of U.S. Civil War Veterans in Egypt”
  • Friday, April 19, at 5 p.m., Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library: Playing ‘Dixie’ in the Wilds of Africa”
  • Saturday, April 20, at 11:30 a.m., Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library: Egypt in the American Imaginary and the Making of an American Archive of Race and Nation”

Glymph’s research and teaching explores the history of slavery and plantation economies, the U.S. Civil War, emancipation and Reconstruction. She is the author of the multiple award-winning book, “The Women’s Fight: The Civil War’s Battles for Home, Freedom, and Nation” (University of North Carolina Press, 2020); and “Out of the House of Bondage: The Transformation of the Plantation Household” (Cambridge University Press, 2008), which won the 2009 Philip Taft Book Prize and was a finalist for the Frederick Douglass Prize. She also co-edited two volumes of the prize-winning documentary series, “Freedom: A Documentary History of Emancipation, 1861-1867,” and has written numerous articles and essays, including the award-winning article “Rose’s War and the Gendered Politics of Slave Insurgency in the Civil War,” which received the George and Ann Richards Prize for the best article published in the Journal of the Civil War Era in 2013.

Glymph is president-elect of the American Historical Association, holder of the 2023-24 Rogers Distinguished Fellowship in Nineteenth Century History at the Huntington Library, and past president of the Southern Historical Association. She is also an Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecturer and an elected member of the Society of American Historians, the American Antiquarian Society and the Gettysburg Foundation Board of Directors. She has also been a historical consultant to several prominent national museums and historical centers and has also consulted on films such as “Harriet” and “Mercy Street.”

Read more about the Brose Lectures

First Brose Lecture featuring Thavolia Glymph, Professor of History and Law at Duke University

April 18, 2024
5:00PM
In Person
Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library

Dr. Thavolia Glymph, Peabody Family Distinguished Professor of History and Professor of Law at Duke University, will deliver three lectures on “Playing ‘Dixie’ in Egypt: A Transnational Transcript of Race, Nation, Empire and Citizenship,” for the Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lecture Series. Taking place on April 18, 19, and 20, the lectures are free and open to the public. This lecture series is sponsored by the George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center at Penn State through the generosity of an endowment by Steven and Janice Brose and cosponsored by the Penn State University Libraries.

The first lecture will be held on Thursday, April 18, at 5 p.m., Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library: “I am not going into the wilds of Africa”: Race and Nation in the Imagination of U.S. Civil War Veterans in Egypt.

“Playing ‘Dixie’ in Egypt: A Transnational Transcript of Race, Nation, Empire and Citizenship” is a study of white Union and Confederate soldiers who joined the Egyptian army of the Khedive Isma’il after the Civil War. It explores why they left the U.S. to become mercenaries of a foreign army and, more centrally, the part they played in making and transcribing notions of race, citizenship, nation, and empire globally and at home. In Egypt, the American Civil War veterans joined an international force of mercenaries, diplomats, explorers, antiquities seekers, journalists, representatives of geographical societies, arms dealers, and tourists, many of whom, like them, were engaged in the fight against the imagined “horrors of racial equality.” In this work, they had the support of the U.S. government— from the White House to Congress and the U.S. Army—and the applause of their communities. When the last of them returned home, Reconstruction was over, and they could say they had played a part in its overthrow.

April 15, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Black Experience Conference

April 12, 2024
In Person

Manuscript Workshop #5: Gautham Rao, Associate Professor of History, American University

April 10, 2024
12:30PM
– 2:00PM
In Person
April 8, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote
April 1, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Professional Development Event #4: Digital Pedagogies and Tools

March 27, 2024
12:30PM
– 1:30PM
In Person

Digital Pedagogies and Tools with Drs. Jennifer Isasi and Lindsey Chandler from Penn State’s Digital Pedagogies & Initiatives

Black Experiences Lecture Series: Chloe Ireton, University College, London

March 26, 2024
6:00PM
– 7:30PM
In Person
March 25, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

The Catto-LeCount Fellows Program for Equity and Inclusion

March 23, 2024
In Person

   

The Catto-LeCount Fellows Program exposes students to doctoral study in the discipline of history. During this three day program, Pennsylvania State University faculty and staff demystify the graduate school admissions process and educate participants about the academic profession. All expenses including travel, housing, meals, and course materials are provided by the university.

Penn State’s Richards Center, the Department of History, the Latina/o Studies program, and the Department of African American Studies sponsor the program in a collaborative effort to attract and enroll students from underrepresented populations.

This year’s program will be held in-person at Penn State from March 23-25, 2023. Application requirements and details can be found on our Catto-LeCount Fellowship Program page.

The Catto-LeCount Fellows Program for Equity and Inclusion

March 22, 2024
In Person

   

The Catto-LeCount Fellows Program exposes students to doctoral study in the discipline of history. During this three day program, Pennsylvania State University faculty and staff demystify the graduate school admissions process and educate participants about the academic profession. All expenses including travel, housing, meals, and course materials are provided by the university.

Penn State’s Richards Center, the Department of History, the Latina/o Studies program, and the Department of African American Studies sponsor the program in a collaborative effort to attract and enroll students from underrepresented populations.

This year’s program will be held in-person at Penn State from March 23-25, 2023. Application requirements and details can be found on our Catto-LeCount Fellowship Program page.

The Catto-LeCount Fellows Program for Equity and Inclusion

March 21, 2024
In Person

   

The Catto-LeCount Fellows Program exposes students to doctoral study in the discipline of history. During this three day program, Pennsylvania State University faculty and staff demystify the graduate school admissions process and educate participants about the academic profession. All expenses including travel, housing, meals, and course materials are provided by the university.

Penn State’s Richards Center, the Department of History, the Latina/o Studies program, and the Department of African American Studies sponsor the program in a collaborative effort to attract and enroll students from underrepresented populations.

This year’s program will be held in-person at Penn State from March 23-25, 2023. Application requirements and details can be found on our Catto-LeCount Fellowship Program page.

Manuscript Workshop #4 with Kelly Kennington, Associate Professor of History, Auburn University

March 20, 2024
12:30PM
– 2:00PM
In Person
March 18, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Manuscript Workshop #3 with Janelle Edwards, Assistant Professor of History and African American Studies, Penn State

March 13, 2024
12:30PM
– 2:00PM
In Person
March 11, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote
March 4, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Professional Development Event #3: Applying for and Tackling Teaching-Heavy Positions with History Department Teaching Professors

February 28, 2024
12:30PM
– 1:30PM
In Person

Professional Development Event #3: Applying for and Tackling Teaching-Heavy Positions with History Department Teaching Professors Jamie Andreson, Sasha Coles, Michael Milligan, and Gregory Peek

February 26, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Manuscript Workshop for Richards Center Postdoctoral Fellow Nicole Viglini

February 23, 2024
10:00AM
– 12:00PM
In Person

Postdoctoral Fellow Manuscript Workshop for Nicole Viglini with Brandi Brimmer, Associate Professor of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and Kimberly Welch, Associate Professor of History and Law, Vanderbilt University

Attendance to this event is by invitation only.

Black Experiences Lecture Series: Nicholas Jones, Yale University

February 21, 2024
6:00PM
– 7:30PM
In Person
Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library

February 19, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Professional Development Event #2: Writing for Public Audiences with the Editors of “Made by History”, Kathryn Brownell & Brian Rosenwald

February 14, 2024
12:30PM
– 1:30PM
Remote
Remote Details:

Writing for Public Audiences with the Editors of "Made by History", Kathryn Brownell & Brian Rosenwald

February 12, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Manuscript Workshop #2 with Lucien Holness, Faculty Fellow, Richards Center and Assistant Professor of History, Penn State

February 7, 2024
12:30PM
– 2:00PM
In Person
February 5, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote
January 29, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Manuscript Workshop #1 with Edward Green, Ph.D. Graduate Student, Penn State

January 24, 2024
12:30PM
– 2:00PM
In Person
January 22, 2024
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Professional Development Event #1 with Catherine Denial, Knox College

January 17, 2024
12:30PM
– 1:30PM
Remote

Catherine (Cate) Denial, Ph.D. is the Bright Distinguished Professor of American History and Director of the Bright Institute at Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois. A distinguished lecturer for the Organization of American Historians, Cate won the American Historical Associations’ 2018 Eugene Asher Distinguished Teaching Award. She serves on the board of Commonplace: A Journal of Early American Life and is a past member of the Educational Advisory Committee of the Digital Public Library of America. From 2001 to 2011 Denial served as the Lead Historian for Bringing History Home, a professional development program for K-12 educators funded by $3m from the U.S. Department of Education. Cate’s new book, A Pedagogy of Kindness (due out later this year), argues that higher education needs to get aggressively and determinedly kind. A Pedagogy of Kindness is about attending to justice, believing people, and believing in people. It’s a transformational discipline.

As creator and director of the Bright Institute at Knox College, Cate oversees a program which supports 13 faculty from liberal arts schools across the United States in their teaching and research for three years, while providing them with $10,500 in research funds and convening an annual summer seminar. She is the PI on a $150,000 grant awarded to Knox College by the Mellon Foundation in July 2022, bringing together thirty-six participants from across higher education in the United States to explore “Pedagogies, Communities, and Practices of Care in the Academy After COVID-19.”Cate is also a pedagogical consultant who works with individuals, departments, and institutions in the U.S., the U.K., Canada, and Australia.

Postdoctoral Fellow Manuscript Workshop for Brooke Thomas

December 8, 2023
10:00AM
– 12:00PM
In Person

BY INVITATION ONLY

We were honored to workshop postdoctoral scholar Brooke Thomas’ manuscript “To Capture a Vision Fair:” Black Sorority Women and the Shift From Respectability Politics to Public Policy, 1935-1975.” As part of our workshops for our postdoctoral scholars, we bring in two senior scholars to comment. For Brooke’s workshop, Crystal Sanders, Associate Professor of African American Studies at Emory University, and Stephanie Evans, Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Africana Studies at Georgia State University, joined us.

Writing Group

December 4, 2023
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Workshop #6: Kirsten Lee, Pre-doctoral fellow

November 28, 2023
12:30PM
– 2:00PM
In Person

This workshop featured Kirsten Lee’s dissertation chapter “Archival Values: Feminist Recovery and the Specter of Blackness in Frances Ellen Watkins Harper and María Amparo Ruiz de Burton.” This chapter considers African and Mexican American women’s relation to landholding and gold in the early postbellum period, specifically in writings of Harper and de Burton recovered in the late twentieth century. Kirsten’s entire dissertation, Scenes of Speculation: Abolition and the Movement Literatures of Black North America, 1784-1886, examines how American westward (and failed southward) expansion secured settler citizenship through speculation and other forms converting land theft into capitalist value.

 

Writing Group

November 27, 2023
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Workshop #5: Moyra Williams Eaton, PSU Grad Student

November 14, 2023
12:30PM
– 2:00PM
In Person

We were so excited to workshop Moyra Williams Eaton’s dissertation chapter, “The Navy’s Systematizers: Surgeons and the Politics of Care in the War of 1812 Era.” Moyra’s chapter looks at the politics and practicalities of Congress and the navy’s efforts to establish a system of naval hospitals for ill and injured sailors between 1810 and the mid-1820’s. Her chapter is drawn from her larger dissertation project entitled “Constructing a ‘Comfortable Harbour’: The United States Naval Asylum and the Systemization of Veterans’ Care in the Nineteenth Century.”

Writing Group

November 13, 2023
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Professional Development Event #4: Michelle Krowl, Civil War & Reconstruction Specialist, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, on using the Library’s online resources

November 7, 2023
12:30PM
– 1:30PM
Remote

Dr. Michelle Krowl led us through a very informative discussion on how to navigate the Library of Congress website to access digital materials. These digital materials included manuscripts, prints, newspapers and other published materials.

Writing Group

November 6, 2023
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Workshop #4: Emma Teitelman, Assistant Professor of History, McGill University

October 31, 2023
12:30PM
– 2:00PM
In Person

The Richards Center community came together to workshop Dr. Emma Teitelman’s manuscript chapter entitled “Enforcing Property and Territory in Phelps Dodge’s America.” Her paper follows efforts to enforce new relations of property in the timberlands of Georgia and mineral lands of Arizona following a period of social and political reorganization during Reconstruction. It shows how jurisdictional boundaries – between national and sub-national institutions, as well as between different national authorities – became a key object of political struggle as capital traversed and transformed different political spaces. Dr. Teitelman’s book project is currently under contract with Harvard University Press.

Writing Group

October 30, 2023
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Writing Group

October 23, 2023
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Professional Development Event #3: Publishing with University Presses: A Conversation with Mark Simpson-Vos, UNC

October 20, 2023
12:30PM
– 1:30PM
In Person

Mark Simpson-Vos, Wyndham Robertson Editorial Director at The University of North Carolina Press, joined us for a conversation about writing for and publishing with university presses. Mark answered a variety of questions about the publishing process, including how to engage with editors and how to begin the process of transforming a dissertation into a book.

Writing Group

October 16, 2023
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Workshop #3: Amanda Kleintop, Assistant Professor of History, Elon University

October 10, 2023
12:30PM
– 2:00PM
In Person

The Richards Center community workshopped “Writing Compensation out of the Constitution: The Making of Section Four of the Fourteenth Amendment,” a chapter from Dr. Amanda Kleintop’s forthcoming manuscript. Dr. Kleintop’s work examines how the United States was one of the few nations in the nineteenth century that abolished slavery without providing monetary or indirect compensation for the vast majority of enslavers. However, neither US
military victories in the Civil War, moral repugnance for the idea that people could be property, nor the Thirteenth Amendment guaranteed immediate, uncompensated emancipation in the South. Rather, Dr. Kleintop argues that it was the result of a post-war contest where Americans leveraged their understandings of wartime loyalty and slavery’s role in the law and economy to pass the Fourteenth Amendment, whose fourth section prohibited any state or the US from paying “any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave.” This chapter explores the origins and outcomes of section four, arguing that the Congress passed section four and dismissed contentious wartime debates over property rights in people to secure Republican control over Reconstruction and uncompensated emancipation as a legacy of Union victory.

Writing Group

October 9, 2023
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Professional Development Event #2: Journal Publishing with Editors of the Journal of the Civil War Era

October 3, 2023
12:30PM
– 1:30PM
Remote

This professional development workshop featured Journal of the Civil War Era editors Kate Masur and Greg Downs. Both professors discussed their experiences as editors of a scholarly journal and took questions from our graduate students, including how to begin the process of submitting an article and how to respond to peer review.

Writing Group

October 2, 2023
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

“Erasing the Union Cause at Olustee: Lost Cause Monuments, US Soldiers Mass Graves”

September 28, 2023
7:00PM
In Person
Pennsylvania Military Museum, 51 Boal Avenue, Boalsburg, PA

This roundtable featured Dr. Barbara Gannon, who received her PhD at Penn State. Dr. Gannon’s current project focuses on Olustee, which saw the largest Civil War battle in Florida and where Union dead continue to lie in unmarked graves.

Writing Group

September 25, 2023
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Workshop #2: Cooper Wingert, Pre-doctoral fellow

September 19, 2023
12:30PM
– 2:00PM
In Person

The Richards Center community came together to workshop “Union Provost Marshals, Wartime Freedom Seekers, and Military Emancipation in the Civil War,” a section from pre-doctoral fellow Cooper Wingert’s forthcoming dissertation. Cooper’s dissertation explores how wartime freedom seekers and Union army provost marshals navigated civil-military tensions and brokered emancipation in the field, and in the process renegotiated and reinvented federalism in the United States. Provost marshals, the military police of the Civil War Era, were initially tasked with maintaining internal military discipline, but provosts’ careful watch over all civilians who entered and exited army lines put them into daily contact with enslaved people seeking freedom. By looking at the relationship between freedom seekers and Union provosts, his dissertation illuminates how the federal system shaped wartime emancipation, and in turn how the claims of enslaved people and the prerogatives of the Union military reshaped American federalism.

Writing Group

September 18, 2023
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Professional Development Event #1: Everything You Wanted to Know but were Afraid to Ask About the U.S. History Job Market

September 12, 2023
12:30PM
– 1:30PM
In Person

We had a great conversation about how to approach the job market and prepare job talks with our distinguished faculty members, including department head Amy Greenberg, McCabe Greer Professor Christina Snyder, Assistant Professor of African American Studies, History and African Studies J. Marlena Edwards, and Assistant Professor of History Lucien Holness.

Writing Group

September 11, 2023
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

Workshop #1: Heather Wasler, PSU Graduate Student “‘A Precedent in favour of Clemency’: Rebellion, Treason, and Amnesty in the Early American Republic”

September 5, 2023
12:30PM
– 2:00PM
Hybrid

Heather Carlquist Walser Manuscript WorkshopA chapter drawn from her dissertation, which examines amnesty as a tool of governance in the United States during the nineteenth century, this manuscript focuses on the use of amnesty as a response to the Whiskey and Fries’s Rebellions in Pennsylvania in the 1790s. In 1794 and again in 1799, citizens of the new United States violently challenged the role and power of the developing federal government by refusing to pay an excise tax on whiskey and a property tax, respectively. State and federal officials sought to reestablish peace in the rebelling areas without sacrificing authority. Despite scholars’ focus on the use of the militia to accomplish these goals, clemency played a pivotal role in restoring order in 1794 and allowed state and federal officials and communities to negotiate the intricacies of constitutional resistance and federal sovereignty. In 1799, John Adams relied on Washington’s precedent of using military force and charging insurgents with treason before also turning to amnesty, despite fierce resistance from other political elites. Exploring the role of amnesty in the Whiskey and Fries’ Rebellions reveals new perspectives on the development of federal sovereignty, the role of the federal judiciary, and the realities of constitutional politics in the Early American Republic.

Writing Group

August 28, 2023
1:00PM
– 3:00PM
Remote

McCabe Greer Manuscript Workshop with Benjamin Frey

April 22, 2023
8:30AM
– 12:00PM
In Person

This workshop is part of the Many Wests book series and will generate a book tentatively titled, Rising Above: Language Revitalization in the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, published by the University of Nebraska Press. The workshop is sponsored by the McCabe-Greer Professorship, Department of History, and the George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center.

The McCabe Greer Manuscript Workshop with Benjamin Frey will is open by invitation only.

 

May History Show Us the Way: Roots of Cherokee Language Endangerment and Paths for Reclamation with Benjamin Frey

April 21, 2023
4:00PM
In Person
110 Buisness Building

The Cherokee language represents the heart and soul of Cherokee culture. Today, with fewer than 200 first language speakers remaining among the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians’ population of 18,000 citizens, the language is severely endangered. In this talk, Dr. Frey discusses the many driving factors of the language’s endangerment and how to address those factors for an effective program of language revitalization.

Dr. Ben Frey is an Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an enrolled member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. His research focuses on language revitalization and the link between social networks, institutional structures, and language behavior over time.

This talk is part of the Many Wests book series and will generate a book tentatively titled, Rising Above: Language Revitalization in the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, published by the University of Nebraska Press. The talk is sponsored by the McCabe-Greer Professorship, Department of History, and the George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center.

Many Wests Editors: Thomas G. Andrews, Ari Kelman, Amy Lonetree, Mary E. Mendoza, Christina Snyder; Acquiring Editor: Bridget Barry

Lunchtime Discussion with Holly A. Pinheiro, Jr.

April 4, 2023
12:30PM
In Person

On Tuesday, April 4th, the Richards Center will welcome Dr. Holly A. Pinheiro, Jr., Assistant Professor of History at Furman University, four our final Lunchtime Talk of the semester. Dr. Pinheiro, Jr. will discuss his process of turning his completed dissertation into multiple publications, including a monograph. In his previous experience, the process of writing publications–articles, books, or blog posts–was not made clear as he navigated the academy. As part of this conversation, Dr. Pinheiro, Jr., will discuss his experiences negotiating with presses–academic and trade–in the hopes of providing transparency to graduate students and fellows. He also welcomes attendees to come with their own questions that he, to the best of his ability, will address.

This event is open to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, pre-docs, post-docs, and faculty

Book Talk with Holly A. Pinheiro, Jr.

April 3, 2023
4:00PM
In Person
Foster Auditorium

On Monday, April 3rd, the Richards Center and the Penn State Department of History will host Dr. Holly A. Pinheiro, Jr., Assistant Professor of History at Furman University, for a book talk in Foster Auditorium. Dr. Pinheiro will discuss his book, The Families’ Civil War: Black Soldiers and the Fight for Racial Justice, recently published in the University of Georgia Press UnCivil Wars Series.

Dr. Pinheiro’s research focuses on the intersectionality of race, gender, and class in the military from 1850 through the 1920s. Counter to the national narrative which championed the patriotic manhood of soldiering from the Civil War through the 1920s, his research reveals that African American veterans and their families’ military experience were much more fraught. Economic and social instability introduced by military service resonated for years and even generations after soldiers left the battlefield. He has published articles in edited volumes and academic journals, in and outside of the United States. His manuscript, The Families’ Civil War: Black Soldiers and the Fight for Racial Justice, (with The University of Georgia Press in the UnCivil Wars Series) highlights how racism, in and outside of military service, impacted the bodies, economies, family structures, and social spaces of African Americans long after the war ended. His book has received rave reviews in the LA Review of Books and the Civil War Book Review. It received an honorable mention, in the Civil War Monitor, for the best Civil War book of 2022.

This event is sponsored by the Department of History, Latin American Studies, and the George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center and is free and open to the public.

The Catto-LeCount Fellows Program for Equity and Inclusion

March 25, 2023
– March 25, 2023
Remote

The Catto-LeCount Fellows Program for Equity and Inclusion exposes students to doctoral study in the discipline of history. During this three-day virtual program, Pennsylvania State University faculty and staff demystify the graduate school admissions process and educate participants about the academic profession. All expenses including course materials are provided by the university. Students also will receive a $250 stipend upon completion of the program. Penn State’s Richards Center, the Department of History, the Latina/o Studies program, and the Department of African American Studies sponsor the program in a collaborative effort to attract and enroll students from underrepresented populations.

This year’s program will be held virtually from March 23-25, 2023. Application requirements and details can be found on our Catto-LeCount Fellowship Program page.

Peniel Joseph: The Third Reconstruction

March 23, 2023
4:00PM
Hybrid
Hintz Family Alumni Center
Hybrid Details:

Watch the event livestream here.

On Thursday, March 23, 2023, historian Peniel E. Joseph will speak about the ideas in his recent book, The Third Reconstruction, which offers a powerful and personal new interpretation of recent history. The racial reckoning that unfolded in 2020, he argues, marked the climax of a Third Reconstruction: a new struggle for citizenship and dignity for Black Americans, just as momentous as the movements that arose after the Civil War and during the civil rights era.

Joseph draws revealing connections and insights across centuries as he traces this Third Reconstruction from the election of Barack Obama to the rise of Black Lives Matter to the failed assault on the Capitol. Joseph is based at the University of Texas at Austin, where he holds the following titles: Associate Dean for Justice, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion; Professor of Public Affairs; Barbara Jordan Chair in Ethics and Political Values; Founding Director, Center for the Study of Race and Democracy. 

This event is sponsored by the McCourtney Institute for Democracy and the Richards Civil War Era Center, and is free and open to the public.

Symposium on Free State Slavery Closing Keynote Address

March 17, 2023
4:15PM
– 5:15PM
In Person
Weaver 102

Kathleen M. Brown, David Boies Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, will deliver a closing keynote address for the Symposium on Free State Slavery entitled “Encumbering Liberty in the Shadow of Slavery” on Friday, March 17th in Weaver 102. This event is free and open to the public.

At the University of Pennsylvania, Brown is a faculty affiliate of Africana Studies, the History and Sociology of Science, the Center for Research on Feminist, Queer, and Transgender Studies, and the lead faculty historian on the Penn & Slavery Project. Brown’s research focuses on intersectional questions of race, gender, sexuality, and labor in colonial North American, Atlantic, and early U.S. contexts. She is the author of two prize-winning books, Good Wives, Nasty Wenches, and Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race and Power in Colonial Virginia (1996) and Foul Bodies: Cleanliness in Early America (2009). Her most recent book, Undoing Slavery: Bodies, Race, and Rights in the Age of Abolition (February 2023, University of Pennsylvania Press), considers how the campaign to end slavery entangled activists in a complex process of undoing longstanding practices and habits of the body central to that institution.

Symposium on Free State Slavery

March 16, 2023
– March 17, 2023
In Person

This symposium undertakes a consideration of the question of slavery in the so-called “Free States,” presenting cutting-edge scholarship by senior, mid-career, and early career scholars. Our authors cover a range of jurisdictions across the expanding United States, using a variety of methodological tools and offering a wide breadth of theoretical insights. Each paper will focus on the symposium theme of slavery and bound labor in jurisdictions that ostensibly banned the practice. Our authors probe their topics from several different angles, and the symposium as a whole reveals both the diversity in regimes and experiences of unfree labor as well as overlaps between the forms of unfreedom African and Native Americans experienced before 1865. In addition to workshops for the pre-circulated papers, this symposium will include two keynote addresses that are open to the public.

The Symposium on Free State Slavery is organized by Kellen Heniford, Richards Center Postdoctoral Scholar; Kathleen M. Brown, David Boies Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania; and Sarah Barringer Gordon, Arlin M. Adams Professor of Constitutional Law and Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania.

Schedule of Events

Thursday, March 16, Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library

4:45pm-5:45 pm., Opening Keynote Address

  • Andrew Diemer, Towson University, “The Underground Railroad and the Struggle for the ‘Free’ State of Pennsylvania”
Friday, March 17, 102 Weaver Building 

Registration for lunch and to receive the pre-circulated papers is required by March 10. Please email Barby Singer at bqs6@psu.edu to register.

9:00 am-12:50 pm, Workshop Papers

9:00am-10:10am, Richard Newman, Rochester Institute of Technology, “Making and Breaking Free State Slavery in New York”

10:10am-10:20am, Break

10:20am-11:30am, Lucien Holness, Virginia Tech, “The Colonial Legacy of Western New York and Southwestern Pennsylvania in the Making of Abolition”

11:30am-11:40am, Break

11:40am-12:50pm, Sarah Barringer Gordon, University of Pennsylvania, “Unlikely Freedom: Slavery, Race, and Law in Antebellum California”

12:50-1:40pm, Lunch

1:40-4:10 pm, Workshop Papers

1:40pm-2:50pm, Mycah Conner, Penn State, “’Damnable Revelation’: Connivance, Counternarratives, and the Wartime Meaning of Free Soil Illinois”

2:50pm-3:00pm, Break

3:00pm-4:10pm, Cory James Young, University of Nebraska – Lincoln, “Hereditary Term Slavery and the Pursuit of Restitution in Antebellum Pennsylvania”

4:15-5:15 pm, Closing Keynote Address

  • Kathleen M. Brown, University of Pennsylvania, “Encumbering Liberty in the Shadow of Slavery”

Symposium on Free State Slavery Opening Keynote Address

March 16, 2023
4:45PM
– 5:45PM
In Person
Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library

Andrew Diemer, Associate Professor of History at Towson University, will deliver the opening keynote address for the Symposium on Free State Slavery entitled “The Underground Railroad and the Struggle for the ‘Free’ State of Pennsylvania” on Thursday, March 16th in Foster Auditorium. This event is free and open to the public.

Diemer has taught at Towson University since 2011. He received his PhD from Temple University and is the author of The Politics of Black Citizenship: Free African Americans in the Mid-Atlantic Borderland, 1817-1863 (Georgia, 2016) and Vigilance: The Life of William Still, Father of the Underground Railroad (Knopf, 2022).

RCWEC Community Manuscript Workshop with Edward Green

February 24, 2023
12:30PM
– 2:00PM
Hybrid

On Friday, February 24th, we will host a hybrid manuscript workshop featuring a dissertation chapter by Edward Green, the 2022-2023 Richards Center Center and Institute Fellow. Those interested in participating should read the pre-circulated paper beforehand and be willing to participate in a constructive conversation. This event is open to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, pre-docs, post docs, and faculty

Lunchtime Workshop with Made by History

February 16, 2023
12:30PM
– 2:00PM
Hybrid

On Thursday, February 16th, editors of the Washington Post‘s Made by History series Brian Rosenwald, Scholar in Residence at the University of Pennsylvania, and Kathryn Cramer Brownell, Associate Professor, Purdue University, will join us for a hybrid workshop. This session will dig into why to write for the public — and how to do it. It will cover everything from the benefits of writing for the public to how to write various types of op-eds, to how to pitch editors and how to publicize your work both within and outside of the academy. This session will address the differences stylistically between academic and public writing and how to adapt to the new form, the benefits and downsides to social media, citations, and other elements of public scholarship as well. This event is open to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, pre-docs, post-docs, and faculty

Manuscript Workshop for Richards Center Postdoctoral Fellow Jessica Wicks-Allen

February 7, 2023
10:00AM
– 12:00PM
In Person

The Richards Center is excited to host a workshop for postdoctoral fellow Jessica Wicks-Allen’s manuscript, “‘If I Am Free My Child Belongs to Me’: Black Motherhood and Mothering in the Era of Emancipation.” The Richards Center hosts these workshops for our postdoctoral fellows during their time at the Center to help prepare their manuscript for publication. As part of the workshop, we bring in two senior scholars to comment. For Jessica’s workshop, Leslie A. Schwalm, Professor Emeritus at The University of Iowa and Marie Jenkins Schwartz, Professor Emerita at The University of Rhode Island, will be joining us. This event is open to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, pre-docs, post-docs, faculty, and other invited guests

Lunchtime Discussion with María Esther Hammack

February 3, 2023
12:30PM
– 1:30PM
In Person
Weaver 102

On Friday, February 3rd, María Esther Hammock, Barra Postdoctoral Fellow at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies,  will join us for a research talk entitled, “Bridging Underground Railroads: Diaspora, Black Freedom, and Abolition in Mexico.”

Dr. Hammack is a Mexican scholar and public historian whose work bridges through a gender lens, the histories of liberation and abolition in North America and the Black diaspora in Mexico. Her first book, Channels of Liberation: Freedom Fighters South of Slavery, reexamines the Underground Railroad to reconsider and broaden the actors, timelines, and geographies of Black liberation in North America and the transnational experiences of Black Americans who left the United States to claim freedom in Mexican spaces.

This research talk is sponsored by the Richards Center, the Penn State Department of History, and the Latin American Studies Program.

 

Manuscript Workshop for Richards Center/Africana Research Center Postdoctoral Fellow Joseph Williams

December 2, 2022
10:00AM
Hybrid

The Richards Center is excited to host a workshop for Richards Center/Africana Research Postdoctoral Fellow Joseph Williams’s manuscript, “Black Club Women, the Production of Religious Thought, and the Making of an Intellectual Movement, 1854-1933.” The Richards Center organizes this workshop for our postdoctoral fellows during their time at the Center to help prepare their manuscript for publication. As part of the workshop, we invite two senior scholars to comment. For Joseph’s workshop, Dr. Barbara D. Savage, Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought at the University of Pennsylvania, and Dr. Shannen Dee Williams, Associate Professor of History at the University of Dayton, will be joining us in-person. This event is open to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, pre-docs, post-docs, faculty, and other invited guests

Lunchtime Discussion with Robert Lockhart

November 15, 2022
12:30PM
– 1:30PM

In “Academic Publishing in the Wake of COVID: What’s Changed, and What Hasn’t,” Robert Lockhart will share the detailed ins and outs of publishing in our current situation. As we begin to emerge from the pandemic and its related campus shutdowns and conference cancellations, what’s changed in how authors approach publishers and how publishers do their work, and what hasn’t? Topics to be discussed include how to approach prospective publishers and pitch your work, how to talk to an editor and what to talk about, and what happens after submission of a book proposal and after submission of a manuscript, among others. Attendees are encouraged to bring questions, both general and specific. This event is open to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, pre-docs, post-docs, and faculty

Robert Lockhart is Senior Editor at the University of Pennsylvania Press, where, for more than 20 years, he has acquired books in U.S. history. Areas of particular interest include Atlantic history, politics and culture, and African American studies. Books he has published have won awards from numerous professional associations, most recently the Organization of American Historians, the American Historical Association, the Western History Association, and the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.

“The Troubled History of Epidemiology: How Slavery, Colonialism and War Transformed Medicine” with Jim Downs

November 10, 2022
11:00AM
– 12:00PM
Hybrid
Foster Auditorium

The Richards Center is pleased to be co-sponsoring, alongside the Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, this event featuring Dr. Jim Downs of Gettysburg College. A historian of slavery and medicine, Dr. Downs will be presenting research from his latest book Maladies of Empire: How Colonialism, Slavery, and War Transformed Medicine (Harvard University Press, 2021).

This event is both in person in Foster Auditorium and will be live-streamed here.

2022 Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lecture Series

November 3, 2022
– November 5, 2022
Paterno Library

Memory of War: The Seventeenth Century and the US Civil War

Dr. Aaron Sheehan-Dean, the Fred C. Frey Professor at Louisiana State University, will deliver the 2022 Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lectures.

Thursday, November 3, 5pm EDT, Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library: Why the Civil War Happened

Friday, November 4, 5pm EDT, Mann Assembly, 103 Paterno Library: Managing Civil War

Saturday, November 5, 4pm EDT, Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library: What Civil Wars Mean

Dr. Sheehan-Dean’s lectures will explore how Americans’ historical consciousness shaped the Civil War. In particular, he will focus on how people remembered and analogized the English Civil Wars (or the Wars of the Three Nations) with their own conflict. Northerners and Southerners both made use of history, albeit in contrasting ways, and Northerners argued among themselves.  From the war’s origins to its final moments, Americans drew on history to contest the legitimacy of rebellion, how to fight a civil conflict, and what the meant.

Aaron Sheehan-Dean is the Fred C. Frey Professor of Southern Studies and chairman of the History Department at Louisiana State University. He teaches courses on nineteenth-century U.S. history, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and Southern History. He is the author of the award-winning The Calculus of Violence: How Americans Fought the Civil War, Why Confederates Fought: Family and Nation in Civil War Virginia, and most recently Reckoning with Rebellion: War and Sovereignty in the Nineteenth Century.

The 2022 Brose Lectures are co-sponsored by the Richards Center and Penn State University Libraries.

Read more about the Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lecture and Book Series

Jamelle Bouie: Why the Founding Fathers Still Matter

October 27, 2022
4:00PM
The State Theatre & Online

The missing ingredient in American democracy is political equality, the idea that all citizens are of equal weight, even if they aren’t of equal voice. It’s not just that political equality is essential if Americans ever hope to realize the potential of their democracy, but that the absence of political equality from our institutions is part of what has warped our political system into something which struggles to express our democratic values.

Jamelle Bouie, a columnist for the New York Times and political analyst for CBS News, covers U.S. politics, public policy, elections, and race. His political instincts provide audiences with unique insight on the past, present, and future of our national politics, policy, and the state of race relations.

The event will take place at the State Theatre (130 W College Ave, State College 16801) and online. Registration is required to attend virtually and in person.

“Why the Founding Fathers Still Matter” is sponsored by the Richards Center and the McCourtney Institute for Democracy.

Lunchtime Discussion with Gerald Horne

October 18, 2022
12:30PM
– 1:30PM

Keeping with the semester theme of writing, the October Lunchtime Discussion will feature Gerald Horne for an informal conversation to reflect on his prolific career and his practices as a scholar. The discussion will be moderated by Richards Center postdoctoral fellow Mycah Conner. This event is open to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, pre-docs, post-docs, and faculty. 

Gerald Horne, Moores Professor of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston, has published three dozen books including most recently, The Counter-Revolution of 1836: Texas Slavery & Jim Crow and the Roots of U.S. Fascism (International Publishers, May 2022).

His research has addressed issues of racism in a variety of relations involving labor, politics, civil rights, international relations, and war. He has also written extensively about the film industry. Dr. Horne received his Ph.D. in history from Columbia University, his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, and his B.A. from Princeton University.

RCWEC Community Manuscript Workshop with Michael Haggerty

October 11, 2022
12:30PM
– 2:00PM

On Tuesday, October 11th, Richards Center affiliates are invited to participate in a manuscript workshop featuring predoctoral fellow Michael Haggerty. Those interested in participating should read the pre-circulated paper beforehand and be willing to participate in a constructive conversation. This event is open to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, pre-docs, post-docs, and faculty.

RCWEC Community Manuscript Workshop with Lauren Feldman

September 27, 2022
12:30PM
– 2:00PM

On Tuesday, September 27th, Richards Center affiliates are invited to participate in a manuscript workshop featuring predoctoral fellow Lauren Feldman. Those interested in participating should read the pre-circulated paper beforehand and be willing to participate in a constructive conversation. This event is open to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, pre-docs, post-docs, and faculty.

Journal of the Civil War Era Workshop

September 17, 2022
9:00AM
– 4:00PM

On Saturday, September 17th, Richards Center affiliates are invited to join Dr. Gregory Downs and Dr. Kate Masur, editors of The Journal of the Civil War Era, to workshop papers with the contributors to an upcoming special issue of the Journal entitled “Asia and the United States in the Civil War Era.” Those who register for the event are expected t0 read the pre-circulated papers and be respectful of the collaborative dialogue between the volume’s contributors. This event is open to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, pre-docs, post-docs, and faculty. 

Lunchtime Discussion with Gregory Downs and Kate Masur

September 16, 2022
12:30PM
– 1:30PM

During this Lunchtime Discussion, editors of The Journal of the Civil War Era, Gregory Downs and Kate Masur, will join members of the Richards Center community for an informal discussion about their own research and writing processes as well as their work as journal editors. This event is open to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, pre-docs, post-docs, and faculty

Gregory Downs is a professor of history at University of California, Davis and the author of three books of history, most recently The Second American Revolution: The Civil War-Era Struggle over Cuba and the Rebirth of the American Republic. He also published a prize-winning book of short stories.

Kate Masur is the Board of Visitors Professor of History at Northwestern University. She’s currently working with illustrator Liz Clarke on a graphic history of Reconstruction in the Washington, D.C., region. Her recent book, Until Justice Be Done: America’s First Civil Rights Movement, from the Revolution to Reconstruction (W.W. Norton 2021), was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for History, won the John Nau Prize, and was named a New York Times Critic’s Pick for 2021.

Downs and Masur have collaborated on three amicus briefs for federal courts, including to the U.S. Supreme Court in the current affirmative action case, and a report to the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol. They co-authored the National Historic Landmarks theme study “The Era of Reconstruction, 1861-1900” for the National Park Service, co-edited The World the Civil War Made (UNC Press 2015); and currently serve as editors of The Journal of the Civil War Era.

Central Pennsylvania Civil War Round Table with Brian Luskey

September 13, 2022
7:00PM
– 8:00PM
Pennsylvania Military Museum

On Tuesday, September 13, 2022, Dr. Brian Luskey, Professor of History at West Virginia University, will deliver “Mercenaries or Patriots? Bounty Men in the Union Army,” for an event sponsored by the Richards Center and organized in conjunction with the Central Pennsylvania Civil War Round Table. The lecture will take place from 7:00pm to 8:00pm at the Pennsylvania Military Museum in Boalsburg and is free and open to the public.

Dr. Luskey is the author of two books, On the Make: Clerks and the Quest for Capital in Nineteenth-Century America (New York University Press, 2010) and Men is Cheap: Exposing the Frauds of Free Labor in Civil War America (University of North Carolina Press, 2020). At West Virginia University, he teaches courses on antebellum and Civil War America, Abraham Lincoln, American cultural history, and the history of capitalism.

Lunchtime Discussion with Heather Ann Thompson

May 4, 2022
12:30PM

Lunchtime Discussion with Heather Ann Thompson – Open to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, post-docs, and faculty

Histories of Healing: An Africana Symposium on Movement and Wellness Plenary Discussion

April 29, 2022
1:30PM
– 3:00PM

The symposium plenary discussion, “A Way of Life: Practitioner Reflections on Movement” will be moderated by Dr. Kathyrn Sophia Belle, chaired by Dr. Jamie Lee Anderson, and will include Ericka Huggins, Dr. Darlene DeFour, Dr. Germon Moriniere Bey, and Nitanju Bolade Casel. – Open to the public

Histories of Healing: An Africana Symposium on Movement and Wellness

April 28, 2022
– April 29, 2022

Co-sponsored by the Richards Civil War Era Center and the Africana Research Center, and organized by Dr. Maryam K. Aziz, Richards Center & African Research Center Postdoctoral Fellow, this Works-in-Progress Paper Symposium will be held virtually on Thursday, April 28 and Friday, April 29, 2022. The theme is “Histories of Healing: An Africana Symposium on Movement and Wellness.” African-descended folks in the Americas have always given serious thought to what activities and materials human beings need to live full lives. Developing strategies to heal and feel well, mentally and physically, reoccurred in Black community building and organizing during the 20th century. Considerations about how to thrive and find joy under systems of oppression centered diverse practices of body movement that were intimately connected to mental and spiritual wellness.

This symposium focuses on connecting scholars whose research provides new thoughts on histories of Black bodies in motion as healing. Practices of African- and Asian descended-movements proliferated the decades that preceded, encompassed, and followed the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements.  Papers will flesh out how movement practices such as karate, yoga, diving, and bachata animated Black life while forcing practitioners to grapple with questions of Diaspora, U.S. cultural imperialism, racial formation, gender, and sexuality. Selected papers will move beyond theorizations of the “body” to explore the myriad ways that historicizing Black peoples’ attention to, and love of movement, captures the relationship of ease and embodiment to “Blackness.”  Overall, this symposium aims to bridge the scholarly divide that can separate diverse movement practices and parse out the relationship between the written archive, the oral archive, and the archives inscribed in the techniques passed down in arts of movements.

Histories of Healing: An Africana Symposium on Movement and Wellness Keynote Address

April 28, 2022
5:00PM
– 6:15PM

Dr. Jasmine Johnson will deliver the symposium keynote address, “An Ephemeral Sum: Black Dance, Conferral, and the Question of Healing” – Open to the public 

Lunchtime Discussion with Premilla Nadasen

April 19, 2022

Lunchtime Discussion with Premilla NadasenOpen to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, post-docs, and faculty

RCWEC Community Manuscript Workshop with Sasha Coles

April 12, 2022

RCWEC Community Manuscript Workshop with Sasha ColesOpen to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, post-docs, and faculty

Lunchtime Discussion with Jonathan Gienapp

March 16, 2022
12:30PM

Lunchtime Discussion with Jonathan Gienapp – Open to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, post-docs, and faculty

RCWEC Community Manuscript Workshop with Cathleen Cahill

March 1, 2022

RCWEC Community Manuscript Workshop with Cathleen CahillOpen to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, post-docs, and faculty

Ariel Ron Author-Meets-Readers

February 24, 2022
4:00PM

Ariel Ron Author-Meets-Readers with Sally McMurry, Matthew Karp, and Gautham Rao, moderated by Emma TeitelmanOpen to the public

Lunchtime Discussion with Karlos Hill

February 16, 2022
12:30PM

Lunchtime Discussion with Karlos HillOpen to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, post-docs, and faculty

Virtual Book Launch and Discussion: Medicine and Healing in the Age of Slavery

December 1, 2021
4:00PM
– 5:15PM

Please join the Richards Center for the first in a new series of virtual book conversations on Wednesday, December 1 at 4pm EST. The 75-minute conversation will feature editors Sean Morey Smith and Christopher Willoughby, and contributors Rana Hogarth, Elise Mitchell, and Deirdre Cooper Owens on the new book, Medicine and Healing in the Age of Slavery. Former Richards Center Postdoctoral Fellow Sasha Turner will moderate the discussion.

RCWEC Community Manuscript Workshop with Emma Teitelman

November 10, 2021
12:30PM
– 2:00PM

RCWEC Community Manuscript Workshop with Emma TeitelmanOpen to Richards Center affiliated graduate students, post-docs, and faculty