You are here: Home / Spotlight

Spotlight

Call for applications - Postdoctoral Scholar, African-American History

Up one level
Call for applications - Postdoctoral Scholar, African-American History

The Richards Civil War Era Center and the Africana Research Center invite applications for a one-year postdoctoral scholar in African-American history, beginning July 1, 2019. All research interests spanning the origins of slavery through the Civil Rights movement will receive favorable consideration. Proposals that mesh with the Richards Center’s interests in slavery, abolition, and emancipation, as well as comparative or Atlantic history, are especially welcome. During their residency, the scholar will have no teaching or administrative responsibilities. He or she will be matched with a mentor, attend professional development sessions and other relevant events, and will be expected to take an active part in Penn State’s community of Africana researchers. The scholar also will invite two senior scholars to campus to read and comment on the scholar’s project.  Successful applicants must have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. within the previous four academic years. Salary/benefit package is competitive. To be considered for this position, submit complete application packets including a cover letter describing your research and goals for the scholarship year, a curriculum vita (6 page maximum), and a writing sample of no more than 30 double-spaced pages. Review of materials will begin November 15, 2018 and continue until the position has been filled. Three letters of reference should be addressed to the attention of the ESSS Selection Committee and submitted as email attachments to richardscenter@psu.edu.  Please direct questions about the process via e-mail to richardscenter@psu.edu. Applications must be submitted online at https://psu.jobs/job/83060.

To review the Annual Security Report, which contains information about crime statistics and other safety and security matters and policies, please go to https://police.psu.edu/annual-security-reports, which will also explain how to request a paper copy of the Annual Security Report.

Penn State is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is committed to providing employment opportunities to all qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status.

The Richards Center would like to welcome Dara Walker to Penn State as the 2018-19 Richards Center/Africana Research Center Postdoctoral Fellow!

Up one level
The Richards Center would like to welcome Dara Walker to Penn State as the 2018-19 Richards Center/Africana Research Center Postdoctoral Fellow!

Dr. Walker holds a PhD in History from Rutgers University. Her research and teaching expertise include African American history, urban history, 20th century U.S. history, public history, and the digital humanities. She received her B.S. in African American Studies from Eastern Michigan University in 2009 as a Ronald E. McNair Scholar as well as a M.A. in Pan-African Studies from Syracuse University in 2011. Dr. Walker is currently writing her book manuscript which examines the role of the high school organizing tradition in the development of black radical politics of the Black Power era. Her research has been funded by the Ford Foundation’s Dissertation Fellowship, the Walter P. Reuther Library’s Albert Shanker Fellowship for Research in Education, and Rutgers University. She has presented her research at several national conferences, including the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH), the American Historical Association (AHA), and the National Council for Black Studies (NCBS). In addition to her research, teaching, and mentoring, Dr. Walker is a regular contributor to Black Perspectives, the blog site for the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS).

Free Summer Mentoring Program for undergrads from historically underrepresented backgrounds interested in getting a Ph.D. in History.

Up one level
Free Summer Mentoring Program for undergrads from historically underrepresented backgrounds interested in getting a Ph.D. in History.

The Richards Center Emerging Scholars Summer Mentoring Program exposes students to doctoral study in the discipline of history. During a one-week summer residential program (June 24-June 29, 2018), Pennsylvania State University faculty and staff demystify the graduate school admissions process and educate participants about the academic profession. Students will participate in a simulated doctoral seminar and attend workshops on a variety of topics, including writing, digital research, and graduate student life. All expenses including travel, housing, meals, and course materials are provided by the university. Penn State’s Richards Center, the Department of History, and the Department of African American Studies sponsor the program in a collaborative effort to attract and enroll students from underrepresented populations.

Follow this link to learn more about the program benefits, eligibility requirements, and how to apply.

Richards Center Accepting Applications for Undergraduate Internships

Up one level
Richards Center Accepting Applications for Undergraduate Internships

The Richards Center invites applications from qualified Penn State undergraduate students for four paid positions at historic sites during the summer of 2018: two at Gettysburg National Military Park and two at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. The internships provide students hands-on experience in the work of public history. These non-credit internships come with a $3,500 stipend and free housing at the national parks.  Follow this link to learn more about these exciting internships.

Acclaimed historian to deliver 2017 Brose lectures

Talks to focus on the “The Death Investigators: Coroners, Quants, and the Birth of Death as We Know It”
Up one level
Acclaimed historian to deliver 2017 Brose lectures


Stephen Berry, Gregory Professor of the Civil War Era at the University of Georgia, will deliver three lectures on "The Death Investigators: Coroners, Quants, and the Birth of Death as We Know It," for the 2017 Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lecture Series. Taking place on Nov. 2, 3 and 4 in Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, the lectures are free and open to the public.

This lecture series is sponsored by the George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center at Penn State through the generosity of an endowment by Steven and Janice Brose.

For thousands of years, stretching back to the origins of humankind, human life expectancy hovered below the age of 30. In the West, after a brief dip in the early 19th century, it rocketed upward, with the sharpest gains in the United States coming between 1880 and 1920. The story of this sudden rise is typically told as a series of medical breakthroughs, such as advancements in vaccination.

Berry, however, adds to this story the triumph of bureaucracy: John Adams created the Public Health Service (a series of naval quarantine facilities) in 1798; the Massachusetts state legislature authorized Lemuel Shattuck’s “sanitary survey of the state” in 1849; the Bureau of Vital Statistics established a national death certification system in 1900. Between 1840 and 1920 the government worked tirelessly on behalf of Americans to save their children and to double the length of their lives.

The schedule is as follows:

  • 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 2:  "From Coroner to Medical Examiner"
  • 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 3: "From Mortality Census to Death Certificate"
  • 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 4: "From Burial Clubs to For-Profit Insurance"

Stephen Berry is secretary-treasurer of the Southern Historical Association and founder and co-director of the Center for Virtual History. The author or editor of six books on America in the Civil War Era (including "House of Abraham: Lincoln & the Todds, A Family Divided by War"), Berry also created and maintains CSI:Dixie, a web project devoted to the coroners' offices in the 19th-century South. His work has been supported by the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Council of Learned Societies, among others.

For more information, contact the Richards Center at 814-863-0151 or visit the website at http://richardscenter.la.psu.edu/.

Filed under: