You are here: Home / Programs / Emerging Scholars Workshops

Emerging Scholars Workshops

The annual Emerging Scholars workshop recruits from around the country advanced ABD’s and newly minted Ph.D.s who present works in progress in African American and women’s history, with critical commentary provided by Penn State faculty.

Historicizing Blackness:  Sports, Performance, and Politics

A workshop for junior faculty, post-doctoral fellows, and advanced graduate students sponsored by the George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center

March 31 - April 1, 2017: The Pennsylvania State University, University Park Campus


Friday, March 31, Penn State Room, The Nittany Lion Inn

6:30-6:45 pm: Welcome and Introductory Remarks by William Blair, Ferree Professor of Middle American History and Director of the George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center, Penn State

6:45-7:45 pm: Dinner (free, seating is limited)  Register by email by March 24 to .

7:45-8:45 pm: Keynote Address by Allyson Hobbs

Allyson HobbsAllyson Hobbs is an Associate Professor in the Department of History and Director of African and African American Studies at Stanford University.  She is a contributing staff writer for the New Yorker.com and a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians. Allyson’s first book, A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life, published by Harvard University Press in 2014, examines the phenomenon of racial passing in the United States from the late eighteenth century to the present.  A Chosen Exile won the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize for best first book in American history and the Lawrence Levine Prize for best book in American cultural history.

A Chosen Exile has been featured on All Things Considered on National Public Radio, MSNBC, and C-SPAN. The book was selected as a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice, a “Best Book of 2014” by the San Francisco Chronicle, and a “Book of the Week” by the Times Higher Education in London. The Root named A Chosen Exile as one of the “Best 15 Nonfiction Books by Black Authors in 2014.”

Allyson has also won numerous fellowships including the Ford Foundation Fellowship and teaching awards including the Phi Beta Kappa Prize. She was honored by the Silicon Valley branch of the NAACP with a Freedom Fighter Award.

Allyson’s next book, Far From Sanctuary: African American Travel and the Road to Civil Rights, explores the violence, humiliation, and indignities that African American motorists experienced on the road.  Jim Crow laws and local customs put mid-century American pleasures—taking to the road, exploring the country, enjoying the freedom and the autonomy of driving one’s own car—out of the reach of black drivers.  This book is forthcoming from Harvard University Press in 2019.

Saturday, April 1, The Nittany Lion Inn

 10:00 am-11:30 am: Faculty Staff Club, NLI, PANEL 1: SPECTERS OF FRAILTY

Introduction by Dr. Amira Rose Davis, Richards Center Postdoctoral Fellow, Penn State 

Ilyas O. Abukar, PhD candidate, American Studies, University of Maryland, College Park, “Refuse Slavery and the Weak Black Body”

Dr. Rhaisa K. Williams, Post Dostoral Fellow in Performing Arts Department, Washington University, St. Louis, “When the Body Gives Out: Emmett Till’s Funeral and the National Staging of Black Maternal Grief”

Response: Dr. Cynthia Young, Head, Department of African American Studies, Associate Professor of African American Studies and English, Penn State 

11:45-1:15 pm: Lunch, Penn State Room, NLI (Advance registration required, seating is limited. Register by email by March 24 to richardscenter@psu.edu)

1:30-3:00 pm: Faculty Staff Club, NLI, PANEL 2: BLACK WOMEN’S EMBODIMENT AND RACE-MAKING

Introduction by Tyler Sperrazza, PhD candidate, Departments of History and African American Studies, Penn State 

Carrie A. Streeter, PhD candidate, Department of History, University of California, San Diego, “Mind-Body Practices for Racial Uplift: Black Women and Expressive Training, 1890s-1920s”

Dr. Ava Purkiss, Assistant Professor, Departments of American Culture and Women's Studies, University of Michigan, “Recreating the Race: Citizenship and Black Women’s Active Recreation”

Response: Dr. Crystal Sanders, Assistant Professor of History and African American Studies, Penn State 

3:00-3:15 pm: Break

3:15-4:45 pm: Faculty Staff Club, NLI, PANEL 3: IMPERIALISM AND ITS DISCONTENTS

Introduction by Amira Rose Davis, Richards Center Postdoctoral Fellow, Penn State 

Dr. Michael J. Gennaro, Assistant Professor of African History, Grambling State University,  “The Empire Boxes Back: Boxing, the British Empire Championship, and Changing Conceptions of Race in the Black Atlantic, 1948-1960”

Connor Williams, PhD candidate, Departments of History and African-American Studies, Yale University, “‘They Struck for the Freedom of Every Black Man in the World:’ Haitian Independence and the African Diaspora in Frederick Douglass’ Historical Imaginary”

Response: Dr. Abraham Khan, Assistant Professor of African American Studies and Communications Arts and Sciences, Penn State 

Co-sponsored by the George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center, National Endowment for the Humanitites (NEH) We the People Challenge Grant, and The African American Studies Department.

 

Past Emerging Scholars Workshops


April 1-2, 2016


2016 Emerging Scholars ParticipantsThe fourth annual Emerging Scholars Workshop,
New Perspectives on Racial and State Violence in the African Diaspora, was organized by postdoctoral fellow Nicole Turner along with managing director Matt Isham and Ph.D. candidate Emily Seitz. Kidada Williams, Associate Professor from Wayne State University, provided the keynote address.  The workshop invited eight scholars in the fields of History, African and African American Studies, and Latin American and Caribbean History, to present their work. They came from such institutions as Rice University, Wesleyan University, University of Liverpool, New York University, and California State University-Fullerton.


2015 emerging scholars

April 24-25, 2015

The third annual emerging scholars workshop, New Perspectives on Migration and Mobility in the Long Nineteenth-Century was organized by Richards Center postdoctoral fellow Cynthia Greenlee with the assistance of graduate students Emily Seitz and Evan Rothera. Lara Putnam, UCIS Research Professor and Chair of the Department of History, University of Pittsburgh, provided the keynote address.  The workshop invited eight young scholars in the fields of History, African and African American Studies, Latin American and Caribbean History, and U.S. Environmental History to present their work. They came from such institutions as Georgetown University, Washington University, New York University and University of New Hampshire.

April 4-5, 2014

ES 2014 group

The second annual emerging scholars workshop, New Perspectives on Violence and Revolution in the African Diaspora, was organized in conjunction with Penn State's interdisciplinary Diaspora Studies Working Group, which brings together students from several departments, including History, English, Women's Studies, Comparative Literature, and Philosophy, among others. The workshop invited eight young scholars in the fields of African American Studies, Comparative Literature, English Literature, and History to the Penn State campus to present their work. They came from such institutions as Berkeley, Cornell, Harvard, and Princeton, among others. Dr. Sibylle Fischer, Associate Professor of Spanish & Portuguese and Comparative Literature and an affiliate in the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at New York University, delivered the keynote address.

March 15-16, 2013

Emerging Scholars Workshop 2013

The first Richards Center emerging scholars workshop, Emerging Perspectives on Race and Gender in the Nineteenth Century. This highly successful workshop brought together recent PhDs and advanced doctoral students to present innovative new research on topics involving race and gender in the Civil War era. Daina Ramey-Berry, associate professor of History and African and African Diaspora Studies and the George W. Littlefield Fellow in American History at the University of Texas at Austin, provided the keynote address.