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March 17, 2012: Richard J. M. Blackett, The 2012 Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lecturer

When Mar 17, 2012
from 04:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Where The Nittany Lion Inn, Ballroom DE
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-0151
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Richard Blackett, the Andrew Jackson Professor of History at Vanderbilt University, will deliver the 12th annual Brose Lectures on March 15, 16, and 17. The lectures, “Taking a New Look at the Underground Railroad,” will examine communities on both sides of the divide between Slave and Free states and discuss the wide array of efforts by individuals in those communities both to assist and obstruct the Underground Railroad. Most histories of this topic focus on the slaves who escaped and the Northerners who offered them safe haven during their journey to freedom. Professor Blackett will expand this view to include the stories of “moles” who remained in the South and “subversives” who periodically traveled to the South to entice slaves to escape. Similarly, he will discuss the motivations not only of supporters of the Underground Railroad but its opponents in the North, too. Professor Blackett’s lectures will move past the romance and myth of the Underground Railroad and reveal its complexity and breadth to show how it not only affected the lives of individual slaves, but also created political havoc that ultimately led to slavery’s demise.

Richard Blackett is a historian of the abolitionist movement in the US and particularly its transatlantic connections and the roles African Americans played in the movement to abolish slavery. He is the author of several books, including Building an Antislavery Wall: Black Americans in the Atlantic Abolitionist Movement, 1830-1860 (Louisiana State University Press, 1983) and Divided Hearts: Britain and the American Civil War (Louisiana State University Press, 2001. He is also the editor of Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom: The Escape of William and Ellen Craft from Slavery (Louisiana State University Press, 1999). At present he is studying the ways communities on both sides of the slavery divide organized to support or resist enforcement of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law, and the ways slaves influenced the politics of slavery through the act of escaping.

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March 16, 2012: Richard J. M. Blackett, The 2012 Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lecturer

When Mar 16, 2012
from 07:00 PM to 08:00 PM
Where Assembly Room, The Nittany Lion Inn
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-0151
Add event to calendar vCal
iCal

Richard Blackett, the Andrew Jackson Professor of History at Vanderbilt University, will deliver the 12th annual Brose Lectures on March 15, 16, and 17. The lectures, “Taking a New Look at the Underground Railroad,” will examine communities on both sides of the divide between Slave and Free states and discuss the wide array of efforts by individuals in those communities both to assist and obstruct the Underground Railroad. Most histories of this topic focus on the slaves who escaped and the Northerners who offered them safe haven during their journey to freedom. Professor Blackett will expand this view to include the stories of “moles” who remained in the South and “subversives” who periodically traveled to the South to entice slaves to escape. Similarly, he will discuss the motivations not only of supporters of the Underground Railroad but its opponents in the North, too. Professor Blackett’s lectures will move past the romance and myth of the Underground Railroad and reveal its complexity and breadth to show how it not only affected the lives of individual slaves, but also created political havoc that ultimately led to slavery’s demise.

Richard Blackett is a historian of the abolitionist movement in the US and particularly its transatlantic connections and the roles African Americans played in the movement to abolish slavery. He is the author of several books, including Building an Antislavery Wall: Black Americans in the Atlantic Abolitionist Movement, 1830-1860 (Louisiana State University Press, 1983) and Divided Hearts: Britain and the American Civil War (Louisiana State University Press, 2001. He is also the editor of Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom: The Escape of William and Ellen Craft from Slavery (Louisiana State University Press, 1999). At present he is studying the ways communities on both sides of the slavery divide organized to support or resist enforcement of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law, and the ways slaves influenced the politics of slavery through the act of escaping.

More information about this event…

March 15, 2012: Richard J. M. Blackett, The 2012 Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lecturer

When Mar 15, 2012
from 07:00 PM to 08:00 PM
Where Assembly Room, The Nittany Lion Inn
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-0151
Add event to calendar vCal
iCal

Richard Blackett, the Andrew Jackson Professor of History at Vanderbilt University, will deliver the 12th annual Brose Lectures on March 15, 16, and 17. The lectures, “Taking a New Look at the Underground Railroad,” will examine communities on both sides of the divide between Slave and Free states and discuss the wide array of efforts by individuals in those communities both to assist and obstruct the Underground Railroad. Most histories of this topic focus on the slaves who escaped and the Northerners who offered them safe haven during their journey to freedom. Professor Blackett will expand this view to include the stories of “moles” who remained in the South and “subversives” who periodically traveled to the South to entice slaves to escape. Similarly, he will discuss the motivations not only of supporters of the Underground Railroad but its opponents in the North, too. Professor Blackett’s lectures will move past the romance and myth of the Underground Railroad and reveal its complexity and breadth to show how it not only affected the lives of individual slaves, but also created political havoc that ultimately led to slavery’s demise.

Richard Blackett is a historian of the abolitionist movement in the US and particularly its transatlantic connections and the roles African Americans played in the movement to abolish slavery. He is the author of several books, including Building an Antislavery Wall: Black Americans in the Atlantic Abolitionist Movement, 1830-1860 (Louisiana State University Press, 1983) and Divided Hearts: Britain and the American Civil War (Louisiana State University Press, 2001. He is also the editor of Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom: The Escape of William and Ellen Craft from Slavery (Louisiana State University Press, 1999). At present he is studying the ways communities on both sides of the slavery divide organized to support or resist enforcement of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law, and the ways slaves influenced the politics of slavery through the act of escaping.

More information about this event…

Teacher wins prestigious Beveridge Family Teaching Prize

Marney Murphy, a teacher at Three Rivers Middle School in Cleves, Ohio is one of two recipients of the American Historical Association's prestigious Beveridge Family Teaching Prize, which recognizes both “excellence and innovation” in K-12 teaching. Marney was an enthusiastic participant in the Breaking the Silence Transatlantic Slave Trade Education Project, an annual summer teachers institute led by Nan Woodruff that helped teachers develop multimedia projects to teach the transatlantic slave trade and its legacy in a global perspective. The nine-year project was sponsored by the Richards Center, ALCOA, and the National Endowment for the Humanities and supported by the United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Marney will receive the Beveridge Award at the AHA’s 126th annual meeting, January 5-8, in Chicago.

Neely publishes new book

Lincoln and the Triumph of the Nation: Constitutional Conflict in the American Civil War

 

This past November McCabe-Greer Professor of Civil War History Mark E. Neely, Jr. published Lincoln and the Triumph of the Nation: Constitutional Conflict in the American Civil War  with the University of North Carolina Press. The book examines how the Union and Confederacy’s respective constitutions “shaped the struggle for national survival.”

Penn State Newswire 11/14/2011

 

Undergraduate Summer Jobs

Gettysburg National Military Park and Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
Undergraduate Summer Jobs

Artillery demonstration at Harpers Ferry

The Richards Civil War Era Center at Penn State invites applications from qualified Penn State undergraduate students for four paid positions at historic sites during the summer of 2012: two at Gettysburg National Military Park and two at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. The internships provide aspiring historians and teachers with hands-on experience in public history. All of these non-credit, paid internships come with a $3,500 stipend and housing.

  • Gettysburg National Military Park interns will work either with interpretive operations or with the museum service branch.  The interpretive operations intern engages with tourists by designing and presenting two public presentations and assisting at the visitor center’s information desk.  The intern in the museum service branch will perform varied aspects of archival and museum management—working with letters written from soldiers and civilians at the time, as well as material objects from the war.
  • Harpers Ferry National Historical Park features one position especially suited to future teachers:  often wearing period costume, this intern prepares, develops, and delivers educational programs about the park for students from kindergarten through high school.  A second position involves working with the visitor services branch, which includes designing and presenting programs to tourists and working the desk at the visitor center.

Application Process: Applicants must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and have not graduated by the time of the internship. Applicants should submit a one-page statement of interest detailing why they would like to work at the particular site and how they think the experience will further their education. They must also provide a letter of recommendation from a faculty member (e-mail is acceptable) and an informal transcript.  Materials must be received by January 13, 2012.

Direct all application materials to Matt Isham, Richards Center Managing Director, 108 Weaver Building, University Park, PA 16802.  For more information, see the Richards Center Web site: http://richardscenter.psu.edu, or contact Dr. Isham at mri113@psu.edu.

Funding is made possible through the generous support of Larry and Lynne Brown and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

This publication is available in alternative media on request.  Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity, and the diversity of its workforce.  U.Ed. LBA 12-78