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Evan Rothera's Article Accepted

Congratulations to Richards Center Graduate Student Evan Rothera

Congratulations to Evan Rothera whose article "Forgotten Fire-Eater:  William Barksdale in History and Memory" was accepted for publication in The Journal of Mississippi History.  Evan is the newest graduate student to join the Richards Center and is a 2010 graduate of Gettysburg College.

The Journal of Mississippi History is published quarterly since 1939 by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History in cooperation with the Mississippi Historical Society and is an illustrated quarterly magazine with stimulating articles by distinguished scholars on the history of Mississippi, the Lower Mississippi Valley, and the South, prehistory through the twentieth century. Bibliographies of books and dissertations related to Mississippi history as well as acquisitions of historical materials to college libraries in the state are regular features, along with book reviews and news of people and events in the history community.

CANCELLED DUE TO ILLNESS: April 20: Seminar – Marnia Lazreg

Marnia Lazreg, Professor of Sociology at Hunter College and Graduate Center, CUNY, will present a seminar entitled, "Saving the French Empire: Religion, Torture and Social Engineering" on April 20 at 4 pm.
When Apr 20, 2011
from 04:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 102 Weaver Building
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Marnia Lazreg is Professor of Sociology, Hunter College and Graduate Center, CUNY, and is the author of Questioning the Veil: Open Letters to Muslim Women (Princeton University Press, 2009); Torture and the Twilight of Empire: From Algiers to Baghdad (Princeton University Press, 2008); The Eloquence Of Silence: Algerian Women In Question (Routledge, 1994), among other books and numerous articles.

Seminar pre-circulated readings:

  1. Torture and the Twilight of Empire:  From Algiers to Baghad, Marnia Lazreg, Princeton University Press, chapters 1, 4, and 5
  2. The Dark Side: The Inside Story of How the War on Terror Turned into a War on American Ideals, Jane Mayer, Doubleday, chapter 6
  3. Fear Up Harsh:  An Army Interrogator's Dark Journey Through Iraq, Tony Lagouranis & Allen Mikaelian, NAL, chapter 2

Professor Lazreg will also be speaking on Questioning the Veil at the Women's Studies Department Coffee Hour Talk on Wednesday, April 20, at 12:00 noon in 102 Weaver Building.  

Why have young women in the Muslim world as well as Western countries taken up veiling? Why are some Muslim women intent upon presenting their turn to the veil as part and parcel of their civil rights? Can the re-veiling trend erase the history of gender inequality in which it is embedded? This talk seeks to answer these and other questions by examining four justifications of veiling, tracing the loss of meaning incurred by the veil wearer in the present geopolitical conjuncture, and assessing the implications of veiling for change in gender relations.

 

March 25: Seminar – Jerry H. Bentley

Jerry Bentley, Professor of History and Editor, Journal of World History, at the University of Hawaii, will present a seminar entitled, "Cosmopolitan Praxis in World History" on March 25 at 4 pm.
When Mar 25, 2011
from 04:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 102 Weaver Building
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Recent attention to cosmopolitan issues opens doors to fresh historical analyses that are particularly useful for world historians developing alternatives to Eurocentric historical scholarship. This contribution will propose an understanding of cosmopolitanism that does not limit itself to inherited conceptions of the Stoics or the Enlightenment: it declines to foreclose on fresh conceptions by predetermining the boundaries of the phenomenon. It is considerably broader than the normative conceptions familiar from philosophical usage or the specific programs recently advocated by political scientists and legal theorists. This alternative conception refers to historical as well as contemporary experience of popular and sometimes even subaltern cosmopolitan behavior outlined here under the rubric of “cosmopolitan praxis.” This term draws attention to the everyday practices by which human agents have worked across cultural boundary lines while pursuing their interests in cosmopolitan societies – the ways human agents have reached beyond the resources of their own cultural communities to learn new languages, behave in accordance with different customs, negotiate tensions between different social and cultural traditions, and serve as intermediaries who sponsor the spread of cultural elements between societies. Although the term has a lofty ring, cosmopolitan praxis of the sort envisioned here also has a dark side in that it has frequently occurred under conditions of hierarchy, oppression, and even brutality. Nevertheless, it has also had significant historical effects to the extent that popular and subaltern cosmopolitanism has served as an incubator of political and social change from ancient times to the present day.

Jerry H. Bentley is professor of history and editor of the Journal of World History. He has written extensively on the cultural history of early modern Europe and on cross-cultural interactions and exchanges in world history. His research on the religious, moral, and political writings of the Renaissance led to the publication of Humanists and Holy Writ: New Testament Scholarship in the Renaissance (1983) and Politics and Culture in Renaissance Naples (1987). His current research concentrates on global history and particularly on processes of cross-cultural interaction. His book Old World Encounters: Cross-Cultural Contact and Exchange in Pre-Modern Times (1993) studies processes of cultural exchange and religious conversion before modern times. He has also written on the periodization of world history and on historiographical issues relating to world history.  Dr. Bentley teaches courses in world history, early modern history, and the expansion of Europe.

Pre-circulated readings:

1)    Cosmopolitan Praxis in World History, Jerry H. Bentley, 2011

2)    Cosmopolitanism:  Its Pasts and Practices, Glenda Sluga and Julia Horne, Journal of World History, Volume 21, Number 3, September 2010, pp. 369-374

3)    Chinese Colonists Assert Their “Common Human Rights”:  Cosmopolitanism as Subject and Method of History, Marilyn Lake, Journal of World History, Volume 21, Number 3, September 2010, pp. 375-392

4)    The Two Princes of Calabar, Randy Sparks, Harvard University Press

March 24: Graduate Student Workshop – Jerry H. Bentley

Jerry H. Bentley, Professor of History and Editor, Journal of World History, at the University of Hawaii will present a workshop entitled, "Recent Research Trends in World History and Publishing in Journal of World History" on March 24 at 4:00 pm.
When Mar 24, 2011
from 04:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 102 Weaver Building
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Jerry H. Bentley is professor of history and editor of the Journal of World History. He has written extensively on the cultural history of early modern Europe and on cross-cultural interactions and exchanges in world history. His research on the religious, moral, and political writings of the Renaissance led to the publication of Humanists and Holy Writ: New Testament Scholarship in the Renaissance (1983) and Politics and Culture in Renaissance Naples (1987). His current research concentrates on global history and particularly on processes of cross-cultural interaction. His book Old World Encounters: Cross-Cultural Contact and Exchange in Pre-Modern Times (1993) studies processes of cultural exchange and religious conversion before modern times. He has also written on the periodization of world history and on historiographical issues relating to world history.  Dr. Bentley teaches courses in world history, early modern history, and the expansion of Europe.

Pre-circulated readings:

1)    Cosmopolitan Praxis in World History, Jerry H. Bentley, 2011

2)    Cosmopolitanism:  Its Pasts and Practices, Glenda Sluga and Julia Horne, Journal of World History, Volume 21, Number 3, September 2010, pp. 369-374

3)    Chinese Colonists Assert Their “Common Human Rights”:  Cosmopolitanism as Subject and Method of History, Marilyn Lake, Journal of World History, Volume 21, Number 3, September 2010, pp. 375-392

4)    The Two Princes of Calabar, Randy Sparks, Harvard University Press

 

March 18: Seminar – Cathy Gere

Cathy Gere, Associate Professor of the History of Science and Medicine at the University of California, San Diego, will present a seminar entitled, "Utilitarianism and Empire" on March 18.
When Mar 18, 2011
from 04:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 102 Weaver Building
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Cathy Gere was born in 1964, attended a grammar school in London, and began her higher education at Oxford University, but dropped out before completing her degree, abandoning the ivory tower for a decade of political activism in London, New York and San Francisco, during which she earned her living as a carpenter.

She completed her BA in her late twenties at New College of California, then returned to England, got an MA in history at Sussex University, and ended up getting funding from the British Academy to do a Ph.D. in History and Philosophy of Science at Cambridge.

After completing a dissertation on the entangled histories of archaeology and psychoanalysis (2001), she stayed in Cambridge for her postdoctoral research, which took the form of a Wellcome Trust funded project in the history and philosophy of the neurosciences, based at King’s College (2001-2004). She then taught history of medicine at the University of Chicago for two years before coming to UCSD in July 2007.

She has published on a range of different topics in the history of science, but her first two books both concern the history of archaeology. The project that she is currently working on is in the history of the neurosciences, and examines the reciprocal relationship between sensory motor psychology and Utilitarian political philosophy in nineteenth-century England.

Dr. Gere is a member of the Science Studies Program at UCSD, and teaches classes in the history of medicine and medical ethics, and the history of the life sciences, especially genetics and the neurosciences.

Publications:
Dr. Gere's latest book is Knossos and the Prophets of Modernism (University of Chicago Press, 2009).

Her first book The Tomb of Agamemnon (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2006; London: Profile Press, 2006; Athens: Patakis Press, 2007) was published as part of the ‘Wonders of the World’ series under the editorship of Mary Beard.

In 2004 Cathy and her brother co-edited a special issue Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences on the ‘Brain in a Vat’

Pre-circulated reading:  Uday Singh Mehta, Liberalism and Empire:  A Study in Nineteenth-Century British Liberal Thought, (The University of Chicago Press, 1999), chapter 1  

February 18: Seminar – Alison Games

Alison Games, Dorothy M. Brown Distinguished Professor of History at Georgetown University will present a seminar entitled “The Web of Empire: English Cosmopolitans in an Age of Expansion, 1560–1660” on February 18 at 4:00 pm.
When Feb 18, 2011
from 04:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Where 102 Weaver Building
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Alison Games is the Dorothy M. Brown Distinguished Professor of History. She has taught at Georgetown since 1995; before she came to Georgetown, she taught for three years at Grinnell College in Iowa. Games writes on a variety of topics related to the history of the early modern world. Her most recent book is Witchcraft in Early North America (2010). Games teaches courses on a variety of topics related to early America, the Atlantic world, and European expansion and global interaction. Undergraduate courses include the Atlantic World, Witches and Witchcraft, Colonial America, American Utopias, Slaves and Captives, and the Age of the American Revolution. Her graduate courses include the core colloquium for first-year students, Global Encounters, the transregional research seminar, and readings classes in early American and Atlantic history.

Pre-circulated readings: